Amazing taonga and engaging films to see

Image: Kete huruhuru [30528], muka base with feathers woven in.

This week the talented MTG Hawke’s Bay team have been busy putting together a new exhibition – Turuturu: Fingers, Feathers and Fibre, focusing on all things woven from the taonga Māori collection. There’s a broad range of amazing taonga to view, showing the rich talent and breadth of creative styles within the collection. We’re very grateful for the support and knowledge provided by guest curator Nigel How who helped us pull this exhibition together. The exhibition is open to the public today.

It’s clear we’re heading into serious festival season with the launch of the Hawke’s Bay Arts Festival on Thursday night and as well the Art Deco Trust putting together their festival programme for February 2020. However at the moment the New Zealand International Film Festival is foremost in my mind as I’m still struggling to figure out how to fit in all the films I want to see.

My young adult sons are very keen on Apocalypse Now: Final Cut in which Cappola finally achieves his original vision for the film. Dystopian films such as Vivarium and High Life also appeal to them, so may be representative of a demographic match?However as a family we’re all excited about Hail Satan? –which looks set to challenge preconceptions about religion and politics in America. On a completely different tangent we all feel the appeal of The Biggest Little Farm which has some stunning cinematography, and while there are clearly a series of challenges there’s definitely an overall feel good factor. 

A number of biographical films on strong females are a theme of the festival. Ask Dr Ruth with whirlwind colourful character Ruth Westheimer, determined to revolutionise how society viewed and talked about sex will be a fascinating watch. Learning more about New Zealand champion of the underdog, Helen Kelly – Together, has a great deal of relevance. And singing legend Aretha Franklin, as a young 29 year old exploring her gospel background while recording an album in a Baptist Church, is shared in Amazing Grace. For a more active biographical film Maiden documents the first all-female team determined to compete in the Whitbread Round the World Race, a traditionally male domain at the time. 

Strong female leads continue in the fiction space with films such as The Nightingale, described as a “bleak, bloody revenge Western”, looking set to challenge all sorts of views on women and Australian colonial history. Who You Think I Am picks up on a current social trend of ‘catfishing’, where people present themselves online as someone other than they really are. I’ll be interested to watch how the script navigates this morally dubious space. On a much lighter note Brittany Runs a Marathon is the main comedy of the festival, following Brittany as she challenges her lifestyle choices and decides to tackle the New York marathon.

I’m loving the fact that this year my sons are really starting to engage with the film festival and looking beyond mainstream blockbusters. Helping them develop a love of real art films gives me great pleasure, knowing they will have this deeper engagement with film to take with them throughout their lives. Whatever your preference or personal taste there’s sure to be something to suit so please come in and get a programme at the museum.

WHAT’S ON 

  • New Zealand International Film Festival begins 29 August at MTG Century Theatre. Tickets available now through Ticketek or at MTG
  • Turuturu: Fingers, Feathers & Fibre exhibition opens today, Saturday 17 August. Free entry
  • Soundbites: Project Prima Volta students perform at MTG Century Theatre. Monday 19 August 12:15-12:45pm. Free event – koha appreciated
  • MTG Movie Club: At Eternity’s Gate. A 2018 biological drama film about the final years of Vincent van Gogh’s life. MTG Century Theatre, Wednesday 21 August, 2pm. Tickets available through Ticketek

Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today Saturday, 17 August 2019. Written by Laura Vodanovich – MTG Director

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Take your seat at the international film fest

With the New Zealand International Film Festival starting at the end of the month, 29 August, it’s time to grab a brochure and work out your must see list. From action-packed thrillers to exquisitely intimate stories – there’s something to suit every taste.

I’m really looking forward to watching the opening film “La Belle Epoque” which pivots around an unusual way of having a second chance at love. Described as a “crowd-pleaser”, this film looks charming and engrossing in equal measures.  

If you love fashion films, and who wouldn’t after last years “Yellow Is Forbidden”, there are two strong fashion based films in this year’s line-up. “Halston” explores the rise and fall of American fashion legend Roy Halston Frowick. The designer responsible for Jackie Kennedy’s famous pill box hat and the toast of the country makes one decision that brings his empire crashing down. While “Celebration: Yves Saint Laurent” gives an insight into the designer behind the famous name.

Continuing on the theme of fabric “Walk on Water” follows artist Christo as he creates a giant fabric walkway across an Italian lake. There are plenty of logistical and bureaucratic challenges to surmount along with many feisty exchanges between the artist and his assistant (his nephew). This is definitely one I won’t miss.

Some more traditional artists are also featured. “Peter Peryer: The Art of Seeing” is a documentary work that explores, critiques and celebrates the work of one of New Zealand’s most important photographic artists. English artist L.S. Lowry’s life, early work and relationship with his mother are explored in a film where Timothy Spall and Vanessa Redgrave give compelling performances.

The only animated film in the line-up “Ruben Brandt, Collector” centres on the story of a man haunted by paintings of famous artists, which he subsequently sets out to steal. This film, described as an “art heist thriller”, looks like it will take viewers on an incredible roller-coaster ride.

There’s plenty of local flavour – “For My Father’s Kingdom” documents Saia Mafile’o and his traditional way of being and unfailing love for his country, Taonga. A trip to Taonga finally allows Saia’s children to truly understand his ways and bridge the generational and cultural gap. Of course “New Zealand’s Best 2019” and “Ngā Whanaunga Māori Pasifika Shorts 2019” are there showcasing a rich variety of short features. “Helen Kelly – Together” looks at the life and legacy of social justice advocate and fighter Helen Kelly. From unions to Pike River, Kelly has stepped in to help others and fight for their rights, leaving behind a huge legacy and generosity of spirit. Something with an element of Hawke’s Bay is “A Seat at the Table” where New Zealand wine makers try to make it on the global stage and rival the ‘big boys’ for a place at the top of the game.

There are many other styles and genre and I’ve yet to even mention some of my absolute top picks so my real problem now is, how am I going to squeeze all the films I want to see into my schedule.

WHAT’S ON 

  • The NZIFF (New Zealand International Film Festival) at MTG Century Theatre begins 29 August. Tickets available now through Ticketek.
  • Soundbites. Project Prima Volta students perform their solo songs and. MTG Century Theatre, Monday 5 August 12:15-12:45pm. Free community event – koha appreciated.
  • Soldiers without Guns – Film Premiere. MTG Century Theatre, Friday 9 August 7-9:30pm. SOLD OUT.
  • Art Walk & Talk: Public Art. Wednesday 14 August, 12-1pm. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • MTG Movie Club: At Eternity’s Gate. A 2018 biographical dram film about the final years of painter Vincent van Gogh’s life. MTG Century Theatre, Wednesday 21 August, 2pm. Tickets available through Eventfinda.

Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today Saturday, 10 August 2019. Written by Laura Vodanovich – MTG Director

Mansfield enjoyed bath house pool

The opening of the newly built Tarawera Hot Springs Hotel and government bathing house was a major event in 1907. On Saturday 9 October John Vigor Brown, Mayor of Napier, along with a group of invited guests travelled in two horse-drawn coaches and several motorcars to Tarawera on the Napier-Taupo Road. Napier photographer, Percy Caz Sorrell, captured the moment, signing and dating his work. 

The Museum’s photographic collection holds two images from that day, one showing the Tarawera Hot Springs Hotel and the other the bathing house. To achieve a good vantage point of the government bathing house, which was perched precariously on a steep hillside, Percy crossed the swift flowing Waipunga River carrying his heavy camera equipment and climbed the opposite hill.

The location of the hot springs at Tarawera had been long known by local Māori, who guided Pākehā to the source – a hole in the rock-face 60 feet above the Waipunga River, just off a roughly formed track. The Hawke’s Bay Herald first mentioned the spring on 15 March 1871. Twelve days later it further reported that “a bath about six feet square, and two and a half feet deep” had been excavated near to the source of the spring, with a rough track cut down to it. The water was reputed to have superior medicinal qualities, which could cure rheumatism and sciatica. The hope was that an accommodation house would be built in close vicinity so that “invalids who wish to take advantage of the waters can do so in comfort.”  

The first hotel at Tarawera, was built in 1874 and used by the Napier-Taupo coach service and independent travellers as a place to change horses and stop overnight. It burnt down in 1906 and was replaced with a two-storey building re-named Tarawera Hot Springs Hotel. The proprietor at the time was Duncan Mackay, whose special brands of beverages, along with the mineral water in the hot springs, were “said to cure all the ills that flesh is heir to.” 

A month later, nineteen-year-old Katherine Mansfield, to become a renowned New Zealand short story writer, joined seven family friends to take a six-week camping trip into Te Urewera country via the Napier-Taupo Road. George Ebbett, a Hastings solicitor, led the party. George, a collector of Māori taonga, was an experienced camper and competent te reo Māori speaker, with a considerable knowledge of Māori history and ethnology. The group traveled in two horse-drawn vehicles, one a roofed coach with open sides that seated four, and they took turns sitting in the less comfortable luggage wagon. To relieve the horses on steep parts of the road the passengers would get out and walk. The group slept in a large, heavy canvas tent – men on one side, women on the other. 

During the journey, Katherine Mansfield kept a diary and wrote letters to family and friends giving a vivid account of her travels from Hawke’s Bay to Te Urewera, Lake Rotorua and Lake Taupō. These jottings were later published as “The Urewera Notebook.” 

In a letter written to her sister, Katherine evocatively describes stopping at Tarawera.

“I felt dreadful – my clothes were white with dust – we had accomplished 8 miles of hill climbing – So after dinner – (broad beans cooked over a camp fire and tongue & cake and tea) – we prowled round and found an “aged aged man” with [who] had the key of the mineral baths – I wrapt [sic] clean clothes in my towel – & the old man rushed home to seize a candle in a tin – He guided us through the bush track – by the river – & my dear I’ve never seen such a cure – I don’t think he ever had possessed a tooth & he never ceased talking – you know the effect? The Bath House is a shed – three of us bathed in a great pool – waist high – and we of course – in our nakeds – The water was very hot – & like oil – most delicious – We swam – & soaped & swam & soaped & floated – & when we came out each drank a great mug of mineral water – luke warm & tasting like Miss Wood’s eggs at their worst stage – But you feel inwardly and outwardly like velvet.”

Sadly the pools are no longer operational or able to be accessed owing to the precarious nature of the location, the state of the pools themselves and danger from slips and falling rocks.

WHAT’S ON 

  • Death and the Maiden. Written by Ariel Dorfman and Directed by David Coddington, this winner of the Laurence Olivier Award, is a play not to be missed. MTG Century Theatre, Friday 2–Sunday 4 August. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • The Architectural Legacy of J.A Louis Hay Exhibition. This exhibition will be closing tomorrow, Sunday 4 August. Come in and view it before it’s gone. Free entry, all welcome.
  • The NZIFF (New Zealand International Film Festival) begins here in the MTG Century Theatre on the 29 August. Programmes are available now from the front counter at MTG and tickets are on sale (through Ticketek) from tomorrow, Sunday 4 August.
  • Soundbites. Project Prima Volta students perform their solo songs and arias to prepare for upcoming auditions and events. These 30-minute soundbite concerts provide the perfect opportunity to enjoy some wonderful singing in the middle of your work day. MTG Century Theatre, Monday 5 August 12:15-12:45pm. Free community event – koha appreciated. All welcome!
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an insightful tour of House of Webb: A Victorian Family’s Journey to Ormondville and learn more about the family and their lives. Tuesday 6 August 11am-12pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an in-depth look at Silver: Heirlooms from the Collection. Tuesday 6 August 12:30-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Curator Māori – Te Hira Henderson as he shares diverse stories of local Iwi Ngati Kahungunu and their enduring connection to the land through the Tēnei Tonu exhibition. Thursday 8 August 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Soldiers without Guns – Film Premiere. Witness the untold story of unsung Kiwi heroes who were involved in the world’s most dangerous military mission. Instead of taking guns into the war-zone, unarmed soldiers would simply take guitars, aroha and culture. MTG Century Theatre, Friday 9 August 7-9:30pm. Tickets available through Eventfinda.

Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today Saturday, 3 August 2019. Written by Gail Pope – Social History Curator

Cultural heart depends on helpers

Volunteers are at the heart of most not-for-profit community organisations. They often outnumber paid staff and for many organisations it would be impossible to operate without them. At MTG we’re very fortunate to have a dedicated team of volunteers who help in numerous ways across the institution.

For some volunteers that is in the museum public spaces – greeting customers, answering their queries, adding additional detail about exhibitions and helping ensure they have a great visitor experience. Others prefer to work out of the public eye, helping with a range of activities from making covers for objects to protect them from dust and light, assisting with exhibition design mock-ups, adding object information to the database, scanning images, transcribing documents and so on.

Volunteers give up their personal time to give back and support organisations such as ours – institutions who undertake important work and add value to the community.

While motivations may vary – the fact that people chose to give their time to the museum shows the value they place on what arts and culture, and specifically MTG Hawke’s Bay, does for the community. Volunteers also provide a level of support and encouragement to staff – when the going gets tough, it’s a reminder that what we do matters and people value the museum.

One such person was Christine Packer who sadly passed away unexpectedly this month. Christine had been a volunteer at the museum since 1994, was a long-time volunteer at the Art Deco Trust and also read with children at St Patrick’s school. Christine was full of energy, warmth, knowledge and enthusiasm and absolutely unfailing in her support and positivity. Always quick with a smile, a piece of advice, some knowledge to share, along with enjoying a laugh – Christine was a regular feature at the museum.

We are all very grateful for the time Christine shared with us and we, along with the many museum visitors who had the fortune to meet Christine, are all the richer for knowing her.

We’d love to have more volunteers, specifically we’re hoping to find a person who would like to help us coordinate, recruit and train volunteers and keep up good lines of communication. The generosity of spirit shown by those who so freely give of themselves, their skills and experiences is not something we take for granted. I consider volunteers to be a key indicator of the health of an organisation and we want to ensure they are feeling valued and supported.

Christine_27 July 2019
Pictured: Christine Packer, who sadly died this month, had been a volunteer at MTG since 1994

WHAT’S ON – for full details visit www.mtghawkesbay.com

  • IN focus – Vincent van Gogh. Panel discussion with international, national and local legends discussing Vincent’s life, work and the myths that surround him. MTG Century Theatre, today 27 July, 4-5:30pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • Experience Leonard Nimoy’s celebrated play, based on hundreds of letters between Vincent and his brother Theo.  MTG Century Theatre, today 27 July, 7:30-9:15pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • Hawke’s Bay Hospitality Awards. Showcasing local talent, and celebrating excellence. MTG Century Theatre, Monday 29 July at 6pm. Tickets available through dashtickets.co.nz.
  • One Heart will be here at MTG until 2 August 2019. Come along, make a flower and contribute to the creation of this colourful, community-focused floral installation
  • Death and the Maiden. Written by Ariel Dorfman and Directed by David Coddington, this winner of the Laurence Olivier Award, is a play not to be missed. MTG Century Theatre, Friday 2–Sunday 4 August. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • The Architectural Legacy of J.A Louis Hay Exhibition. This exhibition will be closing on Sunday 4 August. Come in and view it before it’s gone. Free entry, all welcome.

Written by Laura Vodanovich – Director, MTG
Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today, 27 July 2019

Archives contain rich history

In the words of poet Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), “the universe is made of stories, not of atoms”. There are innumerable stories within the archives collection at MTG – some that have already been told; others yet to be discovered.

Each archival document can have multiple layers. Where a document came from, who it belonged to (including various owners over time), and events it may have been associated with, all add to the richness of the object. Any relationship a document has to other records in the collection increases its relevance. Research around documents such as personal diaries, letters, etc coupled with research around the context of the time, people and place enable these documents to embody whole stories.

Curators draw threads from these primary source materials to weave stories for exhibition themes. Historians research archives when writing articles and books describing aspects of our past. A compelling example is the recently published Dead Letters by Jared Davidson, looking at wartime censorship in New Zealand. Genealogists compile family histories using archival evidence, potentially uncovering stories that may have been buried for generations.

Photographic images are particularly powerful tools for telling stories. Donations of original photographs and negatives have enriched and strengthened the region’s collection over the years, and we’re working to make more of these accessible online. Last year we acquired a wonderful series of glass plate negatives taken by Napier surveyor David Nelson. David worked for the Lands and Survey Department, as did his father William Thomas Nelson, and was involved in surveying the Napier-Taupo road. In 1914 he enlisted with the NZ Expeditionary Force and served in Egypt and Gallipoli before being commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps. He flew in France with No 59 Squadron on the Western Front. Sadly, his younger brother William (known as Pat) was killed in action in France on the 18th April, 1918.

David survived and resumed surveying when he returned to Napier in 1919. He married Alice Maud Marrett and the couple lived at 33 Fitzroy Road, a house they would own until the 1950s. Their children Mason and Elizabeth were born there.

In 1928 the family moved to Singapore, where David was recruited to the Singapore Improvement Trust, a government organisation set up to resolve the country’s critical housing needs. He worked there for many years. After the outbreak of World War Two, he rose to second in command of the Singapore Royal Engineers and, when the city fell to the Japanese in 1941, he was taken prisoner and held in Changi Prison for the duration of the war. There he managed to keep detailed records of the movements of many civilian internees and prisoners of war, and these invaluable records are held in the Imperial War Museum in London. He also wrote a book, The Story of Changi Singapore, which was published shortly after his death in 1972.

The glass plates have been digitised and catalogued and can be viewed on our website www.mtghawkesbay.com. As well as improving access, digitisation helps preserve original documents and photographs by reducing the need for physical handling – the most frequent cause of deterioration. The negatives are housed in individual acid free envelopes in an acid free archival box and stored away from damaging light sources. Temperature and humidity are kept constant in the store, and pest management prevents insect damage. Professional standards of care ensure the preservation of history for future generations.

It’s a pleasure and a privilege to be part of the team looking after the archives and objects in our care for the people of Hawke’s Bay, on behalf of the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust.

20 July 2019_20749
Image credit: Pat and David Nelson, 1910, gifted by Dinah Okeby, Collection of Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust, Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi, 20749

WHAT’S ON – for full details visit www.mtghawkesbay.com

  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Walking Tour. Join a museum curator for a gentle stroll around some of Napier’s streets and learn about local iconic buildings designed by architect Louis Hay. Today – Saturday 20 July 11am–12pm and 2-3pm. Sunday 21 July 11am–12pm. Register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Public Talk. Marine Parade from 1928 to 1938 with historian Michael Fowler. MTG Century Theatre, today – Saturday 20 July, 3-4:30pm. Register through Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • NZ Mountain Film & Book Festival. Enjoy an amazing line-up of films. MTG Century Theatre, today – Saturday 20 July, 7:30pm. Tickets available at MTG front counter or online trybooking.com
  • Free Matariki Family Concert: Toru Whā, Ka Rewa a Matariki. NZ Trio with musician and composer Horomona Horo playing taonga pūoro. MTG Main Foyer, Sunday 21 July, 3:30-5pm. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • IN focus – Vincent van Gogh. Panel discussion with international, national and local legends discussing Vincent’s life, work and the myths that surround him. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 27 July, 4-5:30pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • Vincent. Experience Leonard Nimoy’s celebrated play, based on hundreds of letters between Vincent and his brother Theo.  MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 27 July, 7:30-9:15pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.

 

Written by Cathy Dunn – Collection Assistant Archives
Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today, 20 July 2019

Make moves to remove plastic

13 July 2019_Plastice Free

Each year as plastic-free July approaches I stop to consider what changes are happening around me, what I’m doing in my daily life and what MTG Hawke’s Bay is doing to reduce the amount of single-use and throw away plastic.

It’s been interesting to note the disappearance of plastic straws in many places and conversely watching the new industry of re-usable straws appearing for sale – mostly made of metal or glass from what I’ve seen. The removal of plastic bags from supermarkets seems to have happened relatively seamlessly with many people taking reusable bags with them when shopping or other retailers supplying re-usable sturdy brown paper bags.

An intriguing spin off is that many people are now buying plastic bags to line their wastepaper baskets and rubbish bins. I’ve done a bit of research to see what options are out there for managing rubbish bins without using plastic and it would seem some people now line their bins with newspaper, use heavy paper bags or buy natural corn starch liners. The biggest issue is how to manage ‘wet’ waste and compost seems to be the way to go – separating food waste from dry waste so that newspaper and paper bags don’t turn into a soggy mess.

The community as a whole seems to be taking meaningful steps to make a difference. At MTG we’ve been recycling, including composting, for a few years now and we continue with these practices. We build our exhibition infrastructure out of reusable materials where possible and, with some clever design, have created some object case structures that can be flat-packed when not in use and then reinstalled when required for a new exhibition. Our team use the Resene’s Paint Wise programme to recycle unused paint and always try to find a home for any exhibition materials that are no longer needed.

Where possible we choose retail products that avoid single-use plastic and sell reusable bags, including our Zero bags made from recycled bottles, and provide brown paper bags for any items purchased. Our education team use unwanted items for upcycling projects such as turning plastic bottles into bird feeders, magazines into titiōrea (sticks) for games, old tiles into mosaics, driftwood into hanging sculptures and so on.

One of the challenges the museum’s been struggling with for a while was something to replace plastic water bottles and finally the right product has been found. It still looks and acts like a plastic water bottle but is completely made from plant material – making it both recyclable and compostable. They will soon be available in our gift shop, ahead of summer.

On the home front I’ve been trying to reduce the number of plastic bottles for various products such as shampoo and conditioner. I’ve recently been trying bar products and, while it’s taken a bit of getting my head around (figuratively and literally) I’m loving the change, the way my hair feels and having less plastic to dispose of. There are bar products for almost everything these days and I’ll certainly be switching to using more bars rather than plastic bottles in the coming months.

It can be very daunting beginning the journey to get rid of plastic but once you get going it can be a lot of fun and often unleashes creative ideas as you come up with solutions. There are a lot of clever people out there freely sharing amazing ideas about how to reduce the sea of plastic we’re surrounded by so why not give it a try.

WHAT’S ON – for details visit www.mtghawkesbay.com

  • Last day of the Screenies Children’s International Film Festival. There are still five films screening today. Tickets available through screenies.nz
  • School Holiday Programme – Songwriting with tutor Pereri King. Thursday 18 July, 10am – 11:30am. Ages 13-16. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • Exhibition Talk: Project Banaba. Thursday 18 July, 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in front foyer. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • MTG Movie Club – The Roaring Twenties. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 18 July at 6pm. Tickets available through Eventfinda. Friends of MTG receive a discount.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Behind the Scenes architecture collection tour. Friday 19 July 12-1pm at our storage facility in Ahuriri. Register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Exhibition Tours. Our guides will take you through the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake exhibition. Friday 19 July, 11am–12pm and 2-3pm. Numbers are limited, please register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Walking Tour. Join a museum curator for a gentle stroll around some of Napier’s streets and learn about local iconic buildings designed by architect Louis Hay. Saturday 20 July 11am–12pm and 2-3pm. Sunday 21 July 11am–12pm. Register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Public Talk. Marine Parade from 1928 to 1938 with historian Michael Fowler. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 20 July, 3-4:30pm. Register through Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • NZ Mountain Film & Book Festival. Enjoy an amazing line-up of films. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 20 July, 7:30pm. Tickets available at MTG front counter or online trybooking.com
  • Free Matariki Family Concert: Toru Whā, Ka Rewa a Matariki. NZ Trio with musician and composer Horomona Horo playing taonga pūoro. MTG Main Foyer, Sunday 21 July, 3:30-5pm. Free event – koha appreciated.

School holiday events promise to entertain

Heading into the school holidays there’s lots to keep families entertained at MTG Hawke’s Bay.

On Monday One Heart was launched in our foyer. The community is invited to create a flower (materials and instructions provided) and help make our heart bloom. Over the course of July this large heart will become completely covered in flowers. The brainchild of Laura Jeffares and Sally Crown, this installation celebrates the museum’s place as the cultural heart of the community. This project is the third in a series of floral-based public artworks (flower bombs) created by the duo. The first was a floral photo-booth that appeared, seemingly overnight, in Emerson Street and the second was on the viewing platform which was covered in foraged foliage. We hope you’ll come in, make a flower and take a photo to share with family and friends or post it on social media.

For more family fun Screenies, the children’s film festival, is back in the Century Theatre. Starting on Wednesday 10 July there’s an array of wonderful options to choose from so there should be at least one, if not several, to suit every child’s taste. With the wintery weather upon us it’s a great way to keep warm and dry while treating yourself and your children or mokopuna to a great film. Hopefully we’re building a new generation of film lovers and future film festival goers.

The museum’s school holiday programmes are on again and there’s a range of different themes and options to choose from. Due to popular demand we continue to offer a computer and design based programme, this time learning how to develop a 3D computer model. We also have programmes on song writing, the creative craft of batik, and a look at the history of toys and games.

Our hugely popular activity trail continues with a new search for the school holidays. Our galleries feature things for children to do such as block puzzles, tukutuku weaving panels and a Deco dress-up spot including a backdrop for great photos, etc. The Drop-in Zone will be operating when there are no school holiday programmes on and will feature some new activities, rock monsters and wool monsters to make, which fits in beautifully with the Screenies film festival.

In our shop there are lots of things for children including a range of great children’s story books, te reo Māori card games, toys, a number of great activities to bring out the budding artist and creative side, plus much more.

The museum is here for the community to enjoy and we love welcoming families in. Whether you want to discover history, learn local stories, watch a movie, make a flower, do some shopping – or do it all – we’d love to see you soon.

One Heart_6 July 2019.jpg

WHAT’S ON:

  • Fools & Dreamers – FREE Short Film + Q&A. MTG Century Theatre, Sunday 7 July at 5pm. SOLD OUT
  • School Holiday Programme – 3D Design Time! Come and join other creative minds and discover how to develop a 3D computer model in this hands-on design workshop. Monday 8 July, 10am – 12.30pm, Ages 8+. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • School Holiday Programme – Batik Bags. Come and learn about this traditional form of fabric decoration and see some ancient batik pieces from our museum collection. Tuesday 9 July 10am-11.30am, Ages 8-13. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • Guided Walk & Talk. Join one of our Curators for a lunch time walk discussing highlights of Napier City’s public art works. Wednesday 10 July 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Curator Māori – Te Hira Henderson as he shares diverse stories of local Iwi Ngati Kahungunu and their enduring connection to the land through the Tēnei Tonu exhibition. Thursday 11 July12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Screenies Children’s International Film Festival. Now in its fourth year Screenies 2019 features a programme of award-winning international feature films being premiered on the big screen plus workshops and New Zealand content made for kids, kicking off with a special launch event for movie lovers of all ages. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 11 July – Saturday 13 July. Full programme and tickets available through screenies.nz
  • School Holiday Programme – Toys & Games. Bring in your own loved toy from home and share stories and discussions about toys and get a close look at pastime children’s treasures in the museum collection. Thursday 11 July 10:30am – 12:00pm. Ages 5-8. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • School Holiday Programme – Songwriting with session tutor Pereri King. Come and learn about the origins of music as well as traditional and contemporary elements of songwriting. Thursday 18 July 10am – 11:30am. Ages 13-16. Tickets available through Eventfinda.