Make moves to remove plastic

13 July 2019_Plastice Free

Each year as plastic-free July approaches I stop to consider what changes are happening around me, what I’m doing in my daily life and what MTG Hawke’s Bay is doing to reduce the amount of single-use and throw away plastic.

It’s been interesting to note the disappearance of plastic straws in many places and conversely watching the new industry of re-usable straws appearing for sale – mostly made of metal or glass from what I’ve seen. The removal of plastic bags from supermarkets seems to have happened relatively seamlessly with many people taking reusable bags with them when shopping or other retailers supplying re-usable sturdy brown paper bags.

An intriguing spin off is that many people are now buying plastic bags to line their wastepaper baskets and rubbish bins. I’ve done a bit of research to see what options are out there for managing rubbish bins without using plastic and it would seem some people now line their bins with newspaper, use heavy paper bags or buy natural corn starch liners. The biggest issue is how to manage ‘wet’ waste and compost seems to be the way to go – separating food waste from dry waste so that newspaper and paper bags don’t turn into a soggy mess.

The community as a whole seems to be taking meaningful steps to make a difference. At MTG we’ve been recycling, including composting, for a few years now and we continue with these practices. We build our exhibition infrastructure out of reusable materials where possible and, with some clever design, have created some object case structures that can be flat-packed when not in use and then reinstalled when required for a new exhibition. Our team use the Resene’s Paint Wise programme to recycle unused paint and always try to find a home for any exhibition materials that are no longer needed.

Where possible we choose retail products that avoid single-use plastic and sell reusable bags, including our Zero bags made from recycled bottles, and provide brown paper bags for any items purchased. Our education team use unwanted items for upcycling projects such as turning plastic bottles into bird feeders, magazines into titiōrea (sticks) for games, old tiles into mosaics, driftwood into hanging sculptures and so on.

One of the challenges the museum’s been struggling with for a while was something to replace plastic water bottles and finally the right product has been found. It still looks and acts like a plastic water bottle but is completely made from plant material – making it both recyclable and compostable. They will soon be available in our gift shop, ahead of summer.

On the home front I’ve been trying to reduce the number of plastic bottles for various products such as shampoo and conditioner. I’ve recently been trying bar products and, while it’s taken a bit of getting my head around (figuratively and literally) I’m loving the change, the way my hair feels and having less plastic to dispose of. There are bar products for almost everything these days and I’ll certainly be switching to using more bars rather than plastic bottles in the coming months.

It can be very daunting beginning the journey to get rid of plastic but once you get going it can be a lot of fun and often unleashes creative ideas as you come up with solutions. There are a lot of clever people out there freely sharing amazing ideas about how to reduce the sea of plastic we’re surrounded by so why not give it a try.

WHAT’S ON – for details visit www.mtghawkesbay.com

  • Last day of the Screenies Children’s International Film Festival. There are still five films screening today. Tickets available through screenies.nz
  • School Holiday Programme – Songwriting with tutor Pereri King. Thursday 18 July, 10am – 11:30am. Ages 13-16. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • Exhibition Talk: Project Banaba. Thursday 18 July, 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in front foyer. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • MTG Movie Club – The Roaring Twenties. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 18 July at 6pm. Tickets available through Eventfinda. Friends of MTG receive a discount.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Behind the Scenes architecture collection tour. Friday 19 July 12-1pm at our storage facility in Ahuriri. Register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Exhibition Tours. Our guides will take you through the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake exhibition. Friday 19 July, 11am–12pm and 2-3pm. Numbers are limited, please register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Walking Tour. Join a museum curator for a gentle stroll around some of Napier’s streets and learn about local iconic buildings designed by architect Louis Hay. Saturday 20 July 11am–12pm and 2-3pm. Sunday 21 July 11am–12pm. Register on Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Winter Art Deco Weekend – Public Talk. Marine Parade from 1928 to 1938 with historian Michael Fowler. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 20 July, 3-4:30pm. Register through Eventfinda. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • NZ Mountain Film & Book Festival. Enjoy an amazing line-up of films. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 20 July, 7:30pm. Tickets available at MTG front counter or online trybooking.com
  • Free Matariki Family Concert: Toru Whā, Ka Rewa a Matariki. NZ Trio with musician and composer Horomona Horo playing taonga pūoro. MTG Main Foyer, Sunday 21 July, 3:30-5pm. Free event – koha appreciated.
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School holiday events promise to entertain

Heading into the school holidays there’s lots to keep families entertained at MTG Hawke’s Bay.

On Monday One Heart was launched in our foyer. The community is invited to create a flower (materials and instructions provided) and help make our heart bloom. Over the course of July this large heart will become completely covered in flowers. The brainchild of Laura Jeffares and Sally Crown, this installation celebrates the museum’s place as the cultural heart of the community. This project is the third in a series of floral-based public artworks (flower bombs) created by the duo. The first was a floral photo-booth that appeared, seemingly overnight, in Emerson Street and the second was on the viewing platform which was covered in foraged foliage. We hope you’ll come in, make a flower and take a photo to share with family and friends or post it on social media.

For more family fun Screenies, the children’s film festival, is back in the Century Theatre. Starting on Wednesday 10 July there’s an array of wonderful options to choose from so there should be at least one, if not several, to suit every child’s taste. With the wintery weather upon us it’s a great way to keep warm and dry while treating yourself and your children or mokopuna to a great film. Hopefully we’re building a new generation of film lovers and future film festival goers.

The museum’s school holiday programmes are on again and there’s a range of different themes and options to choose from. Due to popular demand we continue to offer a computer and design based programme, this time learning how to develop a 3D computer model. We also have programmes on song writing, the creative craft of batik, and a look at the history of toys and games.

Our hugely popular activity trail continues with a new search for the school holidays. Our galleries feature things for children to do such as block puzzles, tukutuku weaving panels and a Deco dress-up spot including a backdrop for great photos, etc. The Drop-in Zone will be operating when there are no school holiday programmes on and will feature some new activities, rock monsters and wool monsters to make, which fits in beautifully with the Screenies film festival.

In our shop there are lots of things for children including a range of great children’s story books, te reo Māori card games, toys, a number of great activities to bring out the budding artist and creative side, plus much more.

The museum is here for the community to enjoy and we love welcoming families in. Whether you want to discover history, learn local stories, watch a movie, make a flower, do some shopping – or do it all – we’d love to see you soon.

One Heart_6 July 2019.jpg

WHAT’S ON:

  • Fools & Dreamers – FREE Short Film + Q&A. MTG Century Theatre, Sunday 7 July at 5pm. SOLD OUT
  • School Holiday Programme – 3D Design Time! Come and join other creative minds and discover how to develop a 3D computer model in this hands-on design workshop. Monday 8 July, 10am – 12.30pm, Ages 8+. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • School Holiday Programme – Batik Bags. Come and learn about this traditional form of fabric decoration and see some ancient batik pieces from our museum collection. Tuesday 9 July 10am-11.30am, Ages 8-13. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • Guided Walk & Talk. Join one of our Curators for a lunch time walk discussing highlights of Napier City’s public art works. Wednesday 10 July 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Curator Māori – Te Hira Henderson as he shares diverse stories of local Iwi Ngati Kahungunu and their enduring connection to the land through the Tēnei Tonu exhibition. Thursday 11 July12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event – koha appreciated.
  • Screenies Children’s International Film Festival. Now in its fourth year Screenies 2019 features a programme of award-winning international feature films being premiered on the big screen plus workshops and New Zealand content made for kids, kicking off with a special launch event for movie lovers of all ages. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 11 July – Saturday 13 July. Full programme and tickets available through screenies.nz
  • School Holiday Programme – Toys & Games. Bring in your own loved toy from home and share stories and discussions about toys and get a close look at pastime children’s treasures in the museum collection. Thursday 11 July 10:30am – 12:00pm. Ages 5-8. Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • School Holiday Programme – Songwriting with session tutor Pereri King. Come and learn about the origins of music as well as traditional and contemporary elements of songwriting. Thursday 18 July 10am – 11:30am. Ages 13-16. Tickets available through Eventfinda.

More memorabilia from the Colenso family

The Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust collection includes a nationally and internationally significant holding of material related to Hawke’s Bay’s first missionary, William Colenso. We were keen to add to this collection by purchasing Hawke’s Bay relevant items at a recent auction of Christopher Parr’s collection of rare and early New Zealand documents. Sadly we were outbid by, we understand, a larger institution. Hopefully this material has indeed been bought by a public institution and will therefore remain available and accessible.

However we were successful in purchasing one item – an unpublished biography of Elizabeth Colenso written by her eldest granddaughter. This is an important piece for us, as so little is known about Elizabeth and we’re excited to have this item which will shed light on some lesser-known aspects of the Colenso story.

We’re also very lucky that in 2011, encouraged by Peter Wells’ research, Christopher Parr was inspired to donate letters written in 1851 by William and Elizabeth Colenso’s children, Frances and Latimer. The children had written to their father in a mixture of te reo Māori and English, while he travelled around Hawke’s Bay persuading Māori to turn to Christianity.

Among the collection we also hold a photograph of William Colenso taken in 1858 by Auckland photographer John Nicol Crombie. This type of portrait, known as a daguerreotype, was popular during the early 1840s through to 1860 and was the first commercially successful form of photography. The daguerreotype is composed of a positive image on a thin copper plate with a highly polished mirror-like coating of silver. It is then encased in a sealed package with a pane of glass to protect the plate. This form of photography can be easily identified as the image can appear as either a positive or a negative when viewed at various angles. New Zealand daguerreotypes are very rare as most were sent overseas to family members.

 John Nicol Crombie set off on a tour through the lower North Island in May 1858. Prior to his arrival in Napier he advertised in the Hawke’s Bay Herald and Ahuriri Advocate announcing that his “specimens of Photographic Portraiture” were “universally acknowledged to be unsurpassed.” Crombie arrived at the port of Napier on the steamer Wonga Wonga in mid-August 1858. The 21 August 1858 paper announced with great excitement and anticipation that the “arrival amongst us of a photographic artist is quite an event in the history of our infant township.  It will be seen from our advertising columns that Mr J N Crombie, to whose excellence as an artist we can speak from personal knowledge, and who has just arrived from a successful professional visit to the southern provinces… His stay will be a very brief one – only till the return of the steamer; and it is scarcely necessary to remind our readers, that such an opportunity does not present itself every day.”

Crombie set up business in temporary accommodation at “White Shore” on the Eastern Spit of Ahuriri and named the building “Crombies Royal Photographic Gallery”. On September 11 1858 he encouraged the public to send “home” to family in England a photograph “of those who from a spirit of enterprise or love of adventure, have placed half the globe between them and their hearths.” Such was his popularity that on the request of “numerous settlers” Crombie decided to prolong his stay for a total of three weeks, during which time William Colenso had his likeness taken in the daguerreotype technique. In the image Crombie has captured a slightly stern 47-year-old William Colenso, with arms folded, sitting bolt upright.

3629(1)_29 jUNE 2019

Image: Daguerreotype of  William Colenso, 1858, John Crombie, (b.1827, d.1878), gifted by Mrs W M Simcox, collection of Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust,Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi, m66/53.26 / 27

WHAT’S ON:

  • MTG Movie Club – Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen. It’s time to celebrate Māori New Year and Matariki with pioneering filmmaker Merata, who was the first Māori woman to write and direct a narrative feature. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 29 June at 4pm. Discount for Friends – Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an insightful tour of House of Webb: A Victorian Family’s Journey to Ormondvilleand learn more about the family and their livesTuesday 2 July 11am-12pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an in-depth look at Silver: Heirlooms from the Collection. Tuesday 2 July 12:30-1:15. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Fools & Dreamers – FREE Short Film + Q&A. MTG Century Theatre, Sunday 7 July at 5pm. SOLD OUT
  • School Holiday Programme – 3D Design Time! Come and join other creative minds and discover how to develop a 3D computer model in this hands-on design workshop. Monday 8 July, 10am – 12.30pm, Ages 8+. Tickets are available through Eventfinda.
  • School Holiday Programme – Batik Bags. Come and learn about this traditional form of fabric decoration and see some ancient batik pieces from our museum collection. Tuesday 9 July 10am-11.30am, Ages 8-13. Tickets are available through Eventfinda.
  • Guided Walk & Talk. Join one of our Curators for a lunch time walk discussing highlights of Napier City’s public art works. Wednesday 10 July 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Curator Māori – Te Hira Henderson as he shares diverse stories of local Iwi Ngati Kahungunu and their enduring connection to the land through the Tēnei Tonu Thursday 11 July12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Screenies Children’s International Film Festival. Now in its fourth year Screenies 2019 features a programme of award-winning international feature films being premiered on the big screen plus workshops and New Zealand content made for kids, kicking off with a special launch event for movie lovers of all ages. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 11 July – Saturday 13 July. Full programme and tickets available through screenies.nz

Written by Gail Pope, MTG Curator Social History
Published in Hawke’s Bay Today 29 June 2019

Matariki marks new beginnings

In 2001 The Maori Language Commision, Taurawhiri i te Reo, moved to reclaim Matariki, Aotearoa Pacific New Year, as a tool and focus for the purpose of Māori language regeneration and normalisation.

Since then Matariki celebrations have become common throughout the country.

Matariki is found low on the horizon in the north east of the sky toward the end of May and into the month of June.

It’s an Open Cluster of stars in excess of 3000 best known as “The Plaedies”, or the “Seven Sisters”, these names originating from the ancient Greek. The Pleiads were the seven daughters of a Titan called Atlas who was condemned to hold up the celestial heavens for eternity. Hence the term Atlas has been used for the collection of maps since the 16th century and the Atlantic Ocean meaning the Sea of Atlas.

It is also known as Messier Object M45 by scientists and is part of the constellation Taurus (the Bull). This cluster is about 400 years in distance away from earth and about 13 years across. Usually to the naked eye one will see 7 to 9 stars, or less, but if conditions are crystal clear one can see up to 12 stars.

Matariki is a major sign post in the sky for many of earth’s older cultures as it is for Māori and signals the end of one lunar year and the beginning of the new year.

She, Matariki (Alcyone), is female and mother – the centre star amidst the cluster. Important for the predicting and planning the seasons, cultivating, hunting and gathering, wananga (school), and navigation. It was how the 28 Maori Battalion navigated themselves around the deserts of Africa and the mountains of Italy in WWII when engaging Rommel. Matariki is positioned close to the ecliptic enabling it to be seen from both southern and northern latitudes.

These are the most common stars, Matariki’s children, able to be seen by the naked eye.

  • Tupuārangi (Atlas) is the guardian to food that comes from above your head, birds and fruit.
  • Tapuānuku (Pleione) is guardian to the food grown inside our earth mother Papatuānuku.
  • Waitī (Maia) is guardian to food that comes from fresh water.
  • Waitā (Taygeta) is guardian to the food that comes from salt water.
  • Waipunarangi (Electa) is guardian of the rain.
  • Ururangi (Merope) is guarding of the wind.
  • Hiwaiterangi (Celaeno) is the potiki, last born, to whom you send your wishes
  • Pōhutukawa (Asterope) is the star that carries our dead.

The father of these is Rehua (Antares) but he is not part of the Matariki constellation. I have no idea why and WINZ has no forwarding address.

Matariki is the edited abbreviation of Ngā Mata ō te Ariki – The Eyes of God. This god is none other than Tāwhirimātea, he being the God of Wind and Weather.

When Papatuānuku, earth mother, and Ranginui, sky father, were separated by Tāwhirimatea’s brother Tāne, Tawhirimātea took umbridge and tore his own eyes out. With his eyes in pieces he gave them to the sky, his father Ranginui and they became Ngā Mata ō te Ariki – the Eyes of God. Still distraught to this day from his parents being separated Tāwhirimatea causes the wind and weather from all directions to arise as he feels his way blindly about the sky.

The position of these children in the night sky has relevance to their meanings and designation. Tupuārangi sits above Tupuānuku simply because the sky is above the earth. Waitī sits about Waitā because fresh water flows down to salt water. Waipunarangi with Ururangi sit above all their siblings because rain and wind come from above.

Pōhutukawa and Hiwaiterangi sit away from the rest of the other stars, their siblings to acknowledge their tapu status.

Matariki is a complete holistic lifestyle for everything.  My father for example would study Matariki to see how to conduct himself for the year ahead. He would compare different parts of Matariki, reading the different combinations important for navigation and timing the seasons.

If certain stars shone more brightly, that would indicate a plentiful food source from that area, and that the weather would be good. On the other hand if a star was dull or sometimes even missing it would represent a low or non-harvest outcome with not so favourable weather for the coming year.

This is the lunar calendar, not the European. With all of this, just because Matariki is visible, it does not mean it is neccesarily the correct time to read the stars.  Matariki must be read when the moon is in Pipiri, the correct luna phase and toward the end of the moon’s third quarter, going into the last quarter – usually around June. It is after this that Matariki celebrations as we know it take place.

With all of this there is another canoe to be had, “Te Waka o Te Rangi”.

Matariki is positioned at the front of this canoe ‘Te Waka o Te Rangi’, another constellation, with Tautoru (Orion’s Belt) positioned at the rear. Taramainuku, another star, is the captain.

Te Kupenga a Taramainuku is the net of Taramainuku. When this constellation is in the sky Taramainuku casts his net to gather the spirits of the deceased carrying them in his waka to the underworld. When this constellation rises again Taramainuku releases the sprits of the deceased into the sky to become stars. This is where the saying comes from in whaikorero (speechmaking) to the dead, ‘kua wheturangitia koe’ – ‘you have now become a star’.

All in all Matariki is a time for new harvest, ceremonial festivities and offerings to the land based gods Rongo, Uenuku and Whiro to ensure good crops for the coming year.

Happy Matariki New Year everyone.

WHAT’S ON:

  • NZCT Chamber Music Contest – Central Regional Final. An iconic secondary school musical event held annually throughout the country this is the perfect opportunity for young musicians to compose and to perform chamber music. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 22 June at 11.30am and 4.30pm. $15 per adult with unlimited access to both sessions, door sales only. Free entry for children and school students.
  • Pork Pie Movie Night. Help send five Hawke’s Bay teens to the USA for a Junior Theatre Celebration. This 2017 comedy (a remake of the 1981 Goodbye Pork Pie) follows a trio of accidental outlaws travelling New Zealand in a stolen orange mini. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 27 June at 7:30pm. Tickets available through Eventfinda and include complimentary wine and nibbles.
  • MTG Movie Club – Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen. It’s time to celebrate Māori New Year and Matariki with pioneering filmmaker Merata, who was the first Māori woman to write and direct a narrative feature. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 29 June at 4pm. Discount for Friends – Tickets available through Eventfinda.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an insightful tour of House of Webb: A Victorian Family’s Journey to Ormondvilleand learn more about the family and their livesTuesday 2 July 11am-12pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an in-depth look at Silver: Heirlooms from the Collection. Tuesday 2 July 12:30-1:15. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Fools & Dreamers – FREE Short Film + Q&A. This 30 minute documentary tells the story of Hinewai Nature Reserve, on Canterbury’s Banks Peninsula, and its kaitiaki/manager of 30 years, Hugh Wilson. We learn about the commitment of Hugh and the Maurice White Native Forest Trust to regenerate marginal, hilly farmland into native forest, using a minimal interference method that allows nature to do the work, giving life to over 1500 hectares of native forest, waterways, and the creatures that live within them. The film will be followed by a Q&A with the directors and local guests. MTG Century Theatre, Sunday 7 July at 5pm. Free event, please register online through Eventbrite.

22 June 2019Image Credit: Hawke’s Bay Today

Written by Te Hira Henderson – Curator of Taonga Māori, MTG
Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today, 22 June 2019

 

Paintings show region’s beauty before big quake

Amongst the Fine Arts collection are a selection of oil and watercolour paintings by Napier artist, Lewis Evans. The paintings span from 1905 through to 1935 and depict the local environment:  Ahuriri, Napier and areas on the outskirts of the township. The paintings are an encapsulation of Hawke’s Bay social history portraying the area before and after the earthquake. Of immense geographical interest are the paintings pre earthquake, which show the Tutaekuri River before it changed course, the Inner Harbour, Napier South swamp area and a sandy beach scene at the foot of Bluff Hill.

Lewis Evans was born in Birmingham, 1878, the second eldest in a family of eleven children. He was a member of a family that had achieved considerable prominence in the artistic and architectural world, being the grandson of the noted English Gothic designer and builder Walter Swift Evans and a nephew of Bernard Walter Evans founder of the London Society of Artists.

At the age of nine Lewis contracted the muscle wasting illness poliomyelitis (now known as infantile paralysis). His lower body paralysed, he was for the rest of his life dependent on a bath chair, (similar to a wheel chair) for movement. Owing to this illness and the unsuitability of the English climate, his parents Edward and Kate Evans decided to immigrate to New Zealand when Lewis was sixteen, with his family settling in a small bungalow at 48 Carnell Street, Napier. Lewis turned to studying international politics, military history, classical history and art. A keen observer of nature, its movement, shadow, form and colour, Lewis decided to depict what he saw, using the medium of watercolor and oil.

Restricted in movement, Lewis was wholly dependent on others for getting around. Pushed to predetermined locations by his father, he became a well-known figure seated in his bath chair, accompanied by easel and canvas, painting and sketching. For several years his friend and burgeoning artist, Thomas Arthur (T.A.) McCormack was a constant companion as they roamed the local wetlands and beaches experimenting with watercolour landscapes. He had a special love for Te Urewera and would catch the steamer to Wairoa, and then by coach to Lake Waikaremoana.

Essentially a self-taught artist, art was an uphill struggle for Lewis. Due to financial restraints, he was unable to afford the luxury of a teacher or art school, and struggled to even finance his canvas, paints and brushes. Regardless of this he persevered, constantly producing works to sell. For artistic critique, Lewis would send some of his sketches to his English uncle, Bernard Evans, who in turn would set out a course of studies through literature, for him to pursue.

After the 3 February 1931 Hawke’s Bay earthquake, Lewis meticulously depicted the ruins of once familiar and loved Napier buildings, including the Municipal Theatre, Murray Roberts and YMCA and the Masonic Hotel.

On Christmas day 1931, Lewis Evans, ever adventurous, was involved in a serious car accident. He was riding in his motor-driven invalid chair on the Napier-Awatoto Road when a truck pulled out to pass him. The driver of a car close behind the truck did not see the invalid chair and failed to pull out in time and was forced to swerve to the verge but still struck the chair throwing Lewis onto the road. Luckily, a local Napier doctor – Dr W Fitzgerald, motoring behind attended to Lewis’s injuries and took him to Napier Hospital. Lewis sustained a fracture to the base of his spine. How the injury affected his ability as an artist can only be speculated upon, although we know he did continue painting as we have a 1935 work in the collection.

Lewis died on 8 July 1941, ten days after the death of his father Edward, and is buried in the Napier Cemetery. An exhibition was held at the National Centre for Paralysis at La Jolla in California to honour him and his life’s work. Regardless of all his health and personal battles, Lewis won widespread local and national acclaim as an artist.

WHAT’S ON:

  • Exhibition Talk. Join one of our team for a discussion of twelve landscape paintings in our Five Pākehā Painters exhibition, exploring what these artworks can tell us about Pākeha culture and their relationship with the land of Te Matau a Maui / Hawke’s Bay. Thursday 20 June 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Digital Technologies: Free Teachers Workshop.Led by Te Papa and MTG’s team of educators, focusing on filling your kete of digital tools to take back to your school and implement immediately. Friday 21 June 9am-3pm. Free event, please register at  https://ahikaroa.kiatakatu.ac.nz/dt-tepapa-np
  • Francesco Turrisi. A true ‘musical alchemist,’ Francesco Turrisi is one of the most striking pianists to come out of the European jazz scene in the past decade. MTG Century Theatre, Friday 21 June at 7.30pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • NZCT Chamber Music Contest – Central Regional Final. An iconic secondary school musical event held annually throughout the country this is the perfect opportunity for young musicians to compose and to perform chamber music. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 22 June at 11.30am and 4.30pm. $15 per adult with unlimited access to both sessions, door sales only. Free entry for children and school students.
  • Pork Pie Movie Night. Help send five Hawke’s Bay teens to the USA for a Junior Theatre Celebration. This 2017 comedy (a remake of the 1981 Goodbye Pork Pie) follows a trio of accidental outlaws travelling New Zealand in a stolen orange mini. MTG Century Theatre, Thursday 27 June at 7:30pm. Tickets available through Eventfinda and include complimentary wine and nibbles.
  • MTG Movie Club – Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen. It’s time to celebrate Māori New Year and Matariki with pioneering filmmaker Merata, who was the first Māori woman to write and direct a narrative feature. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 29 June at 4pm. Discount for Friends – Tickets available through Eventfinda.

83.112_16 June 2019Image: Unknown – beach scene, Napier foreshore at foot of Bluff Hill, Lewis Evans, gifted from the estate of Miss Sheila Williams, collection of Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust, Ruawharo Tā-ū-rangi, 83/112

Written by Gail Pope, MTG Curator Social History
Published in Hawke’s Bay Today 15 June 2019

 

Grateful for steadfast support of foundation

2019.11_Nigel Brown_8 June 2019Image: No.8 Wire, 2010, Nigel Brown 

A few years ago at MTG Hawke’s Bay we presented a Nigel Brown touring exhibition, I AM / WE ARE, which included a selection of Nigel’s artworks spanning a period of 35 years.  Among the works was a 2010 piece titled No. 8 Wire. This piece explores the notion of New Zealand as an idyllic landscape with endlessly resourceful people who can fix anything with a piece of number 8 wire. Various iconic New Zealand images are included in the scene – a farmer, sheep, black singlet and of course number 8 wire. The painting challenges the nostalgia around our sense of culture and identity and the words around the image question whether changes made have really represented progress.

At the time of the exhibition we identified No. 8 Wire as an artwork we wanted to acquire for the Hawke’s Bay Museums Trust collection. This work speaks to our national identity in a very relevant way and adds to the small Nigel Brown collection the Trust already holds – bringing the collection up to seven works. It has taken until now to acquire this work as we needed to wait for the exhibition to finish touring and check that the work had remained in good condition. Last month we were pleased to finally acquire No. 8 Wire in very good condition.

This work was purchased with funds from the MTG Foundation – a body which actively works to raise money and support the development of the Trust’s collection. Other works about to be added to the collection through the generosity of the Foundation, are several Richard Wotton black and white prints of Art Deco homes. These works compliment the photographic series shown in the Speedlines and Ziggurats exhibition on display in 2016. These new works increase the regional focus of the images Richard had originally taken, ensuring they represent Art Deco homes from across the region. Without the steadfast support of the Foundation many, if not all, of these purchases would simply not be possible.

Adding to the collection is something which requires serious deliberation, to ensure we are only acquiring works which will enhance the collection, meet our collecting criteria, be relevant, and enable us to develop future exhibitions. We also have very limited access to funds and need to ensure we are spending them wisely. There are many works considered and declined for the collection to ensure we are developing the collection in the best and most relevant way. The same level of consideration is applied to items which are offered as gifts as, although we do not have to pay for the objects or works, we still need to exercise due diligence about what we add to the collection. We do understand it can be disappointing for people when items are not accepted and we always give every item due consideration. We are exceptionally grateful for the support of groups such as the Foundation and the generosity of individuals in donating funds or offering items for the collection.

We’re excited to add these works to the collection and continue to develop the relevance of the collection, making connections across the region and the country.

WHAT’S ON:

  • Pecha Kucha #29. Hear about the hopes, dreams and passions of a bunch of fabulous locals. MTG Century Theatre, Tuesday 11 June at 6pm. $7 per person at the door / cash sales only.
  • Guided Walk & Talk. Join one of our Curators for a lunch time walk discussing highlights of Napier public art works. Wednesday 12 June 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Curator Māori – Te Hira Henderson as he shares diverse stories of local Iwi Ngati Kahungunu and their enduring connection to the land through the Tēnei Tonu Thursday 13 June12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join one of our team for a discussion of twelve landscape paintings in our Five Pākehā Painters exhibition, exploring what these artworks can tell us about Pākeha culture and their relationship with the land of Te Matau a Maui / Hawke’s Bay. Thursday 20 June 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Digital Technologies: Free Teachers Workshop.Led by Te Papa and MTG’s team of educators, focusing on filling your kete of digital tools to take back to your school and implement immediately. Friday 21 June 9am-3pm. Free event, please register at https://ahikaroa.kiatakatu.ac.nz/dt-tepapa-np
  • Francesco Turrisi. A true ‘musical alchemist,’ Francesco Turrisi is one of the most striking pianists to come out of the European jazz scene in the past decade. MTG Century Theatre, Friday 21 June at 7.30pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • NZCT Chamber Music Contest – Central Regional Final. An iconic secondary school musical event held annually throughout the country this is the perfect opportunity for young musicians to compose and to perform chamber music. MTG Century Theatre, Saturday 22 June at 11.30am and 4.30pm. $15 per adult with unlimited access to both sessions, door sales only. Free entry for children and school students.

Laura Vodanovich – Director, MTG
Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today, 08 June 2019

Museum conference challenges and inspires

Te Taiao exhibition_01 June 2019Image: Detail from the new Te Papa exhibition, Te Taiao: Nature

Last week the Museums Aotearoa annual conference was held in Wellington – this year with a theme of ‘This is New Zealand – Ko Aotearoa Tēnei’. The conference had a strong leaning toward repatriation, the Treaty, biculturalism and building futures together. What more fitting place for such discussions than our national museum Te Papa Tongarewa.

There were case studies sharing the ways different institutions are operating in a more bicultural way. These included the Te Tiriti o Waitangi exhibition at He Tohu – National Library of New Zealand, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s kaupapa centred practice and Te Papa’s masterplan which aims to weave Mātaurangi Māori through all disciplines. A history of Tairāwhiti Museum’s roots in biculturalism was an interesting presentation and, having worked there, I can attest to the fact that the bicultural roots of Tairāwhiti Museum adds strength to the institution in a way I haven’t experienced elsewhere. There was also an absolutely fascinating presentation on Te Hau Ki Turanga, the Rongowhakaata meeting house in Te Papa, and the effect the removal of this meeting house from its home has had on iwi.

There’s always lots to learn from what our colleagues and others are doing, or trying to do, and how they are doing it. It’s heartening working in an industry where we’re all willing to help and support each other. There’s little to no competition between institutions – if one is doing well it lifts us all and that’s a powerful place to start from. That said, we do of course have industry awards and we’re proud to be standing shoulder to shoulder with such great company as our fellow finalists and be performing among the best.

While at Te Papa I was interested to have a look at their new $12 million exhibition Te Taiao: Nature. As I only had 10 minutes to race through the very large gallery this is more about impressions rather than a review. The gallery provides lots of space for visitors to explore and many interactive elements, with a strong conservation theme woven throughout. I will definitely make a trip back to have a proper look through the exhibition. The gallery is great for families with lots to keep children engaged. It also provides ample ideas for all ages about personal action everyone can take to make a positive difference in our environment.

These conferences offer an opportunity to check in regarding what the museum industry is doing and any emerging trends, to learn from others examples and experiences, to reconnect with networks and to be both challenged and inspired. This year the conference achieved all these elements and left me feeling excited about what we can do in the future. My take away quote from this year’s conference was Sarah McClintock, Curator and Collection Manager at The Suter Art Gallery: Te Aratoi o Whakatū who noted that we are “so often searching for permission rather than entering into a dialogue and discussion”.

WHAT’S ON:

  • Queen’s Birthday sale in the shop. 20% off store wide, a clearance table with amazing bargains and a free gift for Friends of MTG. Starts today, Saturday 1 June and runs through to Monday 3 June.
  • Jazz Gala: Gregg Bissonette, Louis Dowdeswell & Glenn Walter in concert with the Rodger Fox Big Band. MTG Century Theatre, Sunday 2 June at 8pm. Tickets available through Ticketek.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an insightful tour of House of Webb: A Victorian Family’s Journey to Ormondvilleand learn more about the family and their livesTuesday 4 June 11am-12pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Social History Curator – Gail Pope for an in-depth look at Silver: Heirlooms from the Collection. Tuesday 4 June12:30-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Experience the art of poi making and learn some moves. KahurangiMāori Dance Theatre will guide you through the process of making your own poi, and teach a traditional waiata. Saturday 8 June 10am-12pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event, please register on Eventfinda.
  • NZ Sign Language Taster Class. Tutor Tina Brightwell of Deaf Aotearoa will guide you through English and Te Reo sign language where you’ll learn basic, every day words and gain confidence in NZSL. MTG Education Suite, Saturday 8 June 11am-11.45am. All welcome, free event. Please register on Eventfinda.
  • Behind the Scenes: Photography Collection Tour. Enjoy a tour of the divers and extensive photographic collection as well as leaning how to care for your own photographs. Tuesday 11 June 9am at our storage facility in Ahuriri. Free event. Numbers are limited – please register on Eventfinda.
  • Pecha Kucha #29. Hear about the hopes, dreams and passions of a bunch of fabulous locals. MTG Century Theatre, Tuesday 11 June at 6pm. $7 per person at the door / cash sales only.
  • Guided Walk & Talk with Curator. Join one of our Curators for a lunch time walk discussing highlights of Napier City’s public art works. Wednesday 12 June 12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.
  • Exhibition Talk. Join Curator Māori – Te Hira Henderson as he shares diverse stories of local Iwi Ngati Kahungunu and their enduring connection to the land through the Tēnei Tonu Thursday 13 June12-1pm. All welcome, meet in MTG foyer. Free event.

Laura Vodanovich – Director, MTG
Published in the Hawke’s Bay Today, 01 June 2019